Shop More Submit  Join Login
×




Details

Submitted on
June 15, 2010
Image Size
1.3 MB
Resolution
1701×2688
Link
Thumb
Embed

Stats

Views
4,270 (2 today)
Favourites
123 (who?)
Comments
12
Downloads
71
×
Agouti by Colourize-Stock Agouti by Colourize-Stock
Part 2 of mine and :iconthesapientia: 's collab. When I uploaded the reference sheet thingies some people requested more details on the genetics behind the equine colours.
This is the second one in the series. It's about the cause of Bay and Brown, aka Agouti.
More will come, and we are currently working on getting up more of these. :iconthesapientia: is doing the writing and I am in charge of putting it together and adding photos.

The photos are copyrighted to me, except the last one in the row, the one with the rearing wild bay which belong to :iconshi-stock:

Please download for full view.



* Full copyright to me :iconcolourize-stock: and :iconthesapientia:
You may not use this, and under no circumstances reupload or redistribute this
Add a Comment:
 
:iconmipegaso:
mipegaso Featured By Owner Oct 14, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
Really good articles :D Is the first photo stock...?
Thanks!
Reply
:iconcolourize-stock:
Colourize-Stock Featured By Owner Oct 14, 2011
The only one that's stock is the one in the bottom. The first ones are my own private photos:)
Reply
:iconmipegaso:
mipegaso Featured By Owner Oct 14, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
Okay! Thankss!
Reply
:iconjnferrigno:
JNFerrigno Featured By Owner Jun 15, 2010
I'm going to add these to the equine genetics club. Feel free to refer to any of these articles I have up about genetics [link] As of 2001 they have had the Brown allele isolated and can now test for it. The problem with brown, is that these brown horses can look either black, or bay.
Reply
:iconthesapientia:
theSapientia Featured By Owner Jun 15, 2010  Hobbyist Photographer
The Brown/Seal Bay theory I proposed is one of the more widely accepted, that the At allele is part of Agouti in a multiple allelic series. The tan and black/dark brown markings stay year round, thus excluding the thought of sooty/smutty which is mostly thought to be seasonal. I'm sorry if there was any confusion.

However, I am very interested in who you meant by 'they' and if 'they' ever published their research, or only their findings? I'm aware of a few groups that have claimed to have found multiple alleles in the Bay locus, and/or finding a 'Brown' locus. I have yet, however, to find any documented proof, so I'm quite interested to find out. :)
Reply
:iconjnferrigno:
JNFerrigno Featured By Owner Jun 15, 2010
Sorry forgot to add that [link] has a test for At.
Reply
:iconthesapientia:
theSapientia Featured By Owner Jun 15, 2010  Hobbyist Photographer
This was noted in the text. The lab has never released their research, to my knowledge.
Reply
:iconjnferrigno:
JNFerrigno Featured By Owner Jun 15, 2010
Alright dates were a little off I think, the French scientist Rieder and his colleagues were the ones that really laid the foundation for At and I believe disproved Sponenbergs theory of ED. However they did more in the name of 'aa' (black) then Brown. But if you read this article [link] you'll find out that it was Rieders research (which was publushed in a number of scientific journals, you can find the abstract and usually first page online) that helped get it into motion. I'm part of a genetic discussion group that has people like Carolyn Shepard (known for champagne horses), Leah Patton (known for donkey color), Sharon Batteate (known for brindles), and Barbara Kostelnik (runs the best up-to-date genetic websites out there on the web). If you want something more tangible you can order Sponenbergs 2009 book, the topic of brown is quite confusing, and he actually barely mentions it, and insists on the presence of ED. Even I was confused by the few times he discussed Brown, and I found that the people I mentioned above provided better help in understanding how At works and what to look for. Sadly, little is known about it in regards to other dilutions and modifiers, which I'd like to see more of.

So that would be who I mean by 'they'. And there are multiple alleles in the Agouti Locus, however not as far extensive as those seen in smaller rodents, and other live stock.
Reply
:iconthesapientia:
theSapientia Featured By Owner Jun 15, 2010  Hobbyist Photographer
Thank you for the information. I'll do some reading and we'll update the text as needed. :)
Reply
:iconcolourize-stock:
Colourize-Stock Featured By Owner Jun 15, 2010
Oh, I didn't know that, but I'll make sure to update the text as soon as possible.

And I must say, I'm surpriced that I haven't found your articles until now! They are really good, and so detailed. I've only had time to browse through them, but I definitely liked what I saw. Your pearl article was without doubt the best one I've seen!
I'll definitely make sure to fully read them, and will be watching you for sure.:)
Reply
Add a Comment: